Novi Sad Agreement

The situation eased somewhat on the eve of the Second World War (see the founding of Banovina Hrvatska inside Yugoslavia in 1939), but with the capitulation of Yugoslavia and the creation of the Nazi puppet „Independent State of Croatia“ (1941-1945) came another, this time barely predictable and extremely grotesque attack on the Croatian norm : Pavel Anteic`s totalitarian dictatorship pushed natural purist tendencies to ridiculous extremes and an attempt to reintroduce ancient morphonological spelling before Ivan Broz`s 1892 spelling prescriptions. The agreement also established that the future language should develop naturally, although it was forged by the political will and pressure of both dialects. [Citation required] The ensuing scandal was seen as a de facto victory for the rest of the different factions within Yugoslavia and the call for greater separation from the federal state grew. In 1967, the Croats responded to this outcry by refusing to respect the agreement, representative of the fragile nature, endemic not only for the nation, but for the entire region. The new terminology and dictionary have their roots in both languages, and the literary journal, present in the agreement, would have the same content, which is published in both Cyrillic Serbian and Roman Croatian. As a direct result of the agreement, Matica srpska and his Croatian counterpart Matica hrvatska published an orthographic manual in 1960. Although it was widely praised by all levels of Serbian and Yugoslav leaders and intellectuals, the spelling was severely criticized by Croatian intellectuals, who considered the work too serbo-centered. Their criticism was based mainly on the analysis of the case of larger differences between the two dialects and asserted that the dictionary preferred the eastern variant of the language over the Western one. The new terminology and dictionary have their roots in both variants of the language, and the literary journal, present in the agreement, would have the same content that is published in both Cyrillic and Latin. However, many, like the Croatian intellectual Ljudevit Jonke, regarded the agreement as a disguised attempt to make Serbian the official language of a federalized Yugoslavia, giving only a nod to the Croatian. [Citation required] However, many, like the Croatian intellectual Ljudevit Jonke, saw the agreement as a disguised attempt to make Serbian the official language of a federal Yugoslavia and to annihilate other languages, such as Dalmatians, by giving the Croatian only a temporary nod.

The agreement is also seen as the culmination of relations between the Serb and Croatian factions within the Federal Yugoslavia, which quickly decentralized. Shortly after Stalin`s death, the nation was no longer able to define itself as an autonomous and opposite species of communist nation, and the construction of a united federal Yugoslavia was no longer the nation`s top priority. Group conflicts and power struggles following a scandal in which the head of the Yugoslav security services, the UDBA, wiretapped the residences of senior Serbian party officials and even placed the Yugoslav head of state, Josip Broz Tito, under surveillance. The agreement focused on the similarities between the two dialects and aimed primarily at reconciling the different dialects in favour of a federalized Yugoslavia. The agreement stipulated that groups of linguists and intellectuals, both the Osterbi variant and the westcroate, would work together to establish a single dictionary and unique terminology. Sponsored by the Serbian cultural organization Letopis Matice srpske editorial, lectures on the use and acceptance of Serbian, which is used in Cyrillic and is used on the city of Belgrade (known as the eastern diversity of Serbo-Croatian) and the Croatian dialect (which uses Latin writing, centered on the city of Zagreb, and is known as the western variety of Serbo-Croatian) in the Serbian province of Vojvodina.